7 Things You Need to Know About Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa is a Pan-African holiday that celebrates culture, community, and self-determination. This holiday was created in 1966 by Maulana Karenga, and it is celebrated from December 26 to January 1. Kwanzaa emphasizes seven core principles (Nguzo Saba) and culminates in a communal feast called Karamu. There are many aspects of this holiday that can be easily overlooked, so here are 7 important things you need to know about Kwanzaa.

Kwanza ornaments

1) Kwanzaa is a Pan-African holiday

Kwanzaa is a Pan-African holiday because it is celebrated by people from across Africa and the African diaspora. It was created by activist Maulana Karenga in 1966 as a way to honor African American culture and to create a sense of communal identity and pride. Kwanzaa focuses on seven core principles, or Nguzo Saba, which are drawn from African traditions and values. These include unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith.

The fact that Kwanzaa is celebrated by people from all over Africa and its diaspora makes it an actual Pan-African holiday. It emphasizes the shared values of African cultures and promotes unity among those who celebrate it. Moreover, it serves as a reminder of the strength and resilience of African American communities despite all the challenges they face. Through the celebration of Kwanzaa, African Americans can come together to honor their culture and create a sense of solidarity.

2) Kwanzaa celebrates African American culture

Kwanzaa is an important annual celebration of African American culture, originating from West and Southeast African harvest festivals. The festivities span from December 26 to January 1 and culminate in a communal feast called Karamu on the sixth day. 

Kwanzaa is an opportunity for African Americans to gather with their families, friends, and communities to celebrate their culture. It is a time to reflect upon the beauty, strength, and resilience of African American history, heritage, and values. The seven principles or Nguzo Saba of Kwanzaa—unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith—are central to the celebration.

The holiday is marked by various activities like lighting the Kinara candles to represent the seven principles of Kwanzaa, gathering together for feasts and meals, exchanging gifts, reflecting on African American history and culture, singing traditional songs, making arts and crafts, and more. Kwanzaa is a meaningful way for African-Americans to reaffirm their culture and build strong community ties.

3) The name Kwanzaa comes from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, which means first fruits

 The name Kwanzaa comes from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, which means first fruits and reflects the traditional African harvest festival traditions.

Kwanzaa is a seven-day celebration, beginning on December 26 and ending on January 1. Each day of the celebration focuses on a different principle, such as unity, creativity, and faith. During each day of Kwanzaa, participants can focus on that day’s principle and engage in activities that honor African American culture.

The culminating event of Kwanzaa is the Karamu feast, which usually occurs on the sixth day. This is a communal meal where family and friends come together to share a meal and celebrate. It’s traditional for those who attend the Karamu feast to wear their best African attire.

4) The holiday lasts for seven days

Kwanzaa is a seven-day celebration of African American culture, beginning on December 26 and ending on January 1. During the holiday, people come together in celebration and focus on the seven core principles (Nguzo Saba). Each of these principles has its own day, each with its own African name.

The first day of Kwanzaa is Umoja (unity), which honors the importance of togetherness among family, community, nation, and race. The second day is Kujichagulia (self-determination), and it’s about valuing and asserting our collective self-identity and communal will. The third day is Ujima (collective work and responsibility), which stresses the need to work together for the benefit of the collective community.

The fourth day of Kwanzaa is Ujamaa (cooperative economics), celebrating economic practices emphasizing solidarity, shared purpose, and mutual responsibility. The fifth day is Nia (purpose), which emphasizes the importance of collective purpose and vision in the African American community. The sixth day is Kuumba (creativity), which celebrates the power of creativity and imagination to transform the world.

The seventh and final day of Kwanzaa is Imani (faith), a reminder to have faith in the power of justice and truth to prevail. As you celebrate Kwanzaa, remember these seven principles and be proud of your culture!

5) Each day of Kwanzaa celebrates a different principle

Kwanzaa is a celebration of African American culture and is based on African harvest festival traditions from various parts of West and Southeast Africa. It is celebrated from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a communal feast called Karamu, usually on the sixth day. Each day of Kwanzaa celebrates a different principle, and here are 7 things you need to know about the 7 principles:

1. Umoja (Unity): On the first day of Kwanzaa, Umoja celebrates togetherness as a family, community, nation, and race.

2. Kujichagulia (Self-Determination): On the second day of Kwanzaa, Kujichagulia encourages individuals to define themselves and speak for themselves.

3. Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility): On the third day of Kwanzaa, Ujima encourages people to build and maintain their community together.

4. Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): On the fourth day of Kwanzaa, Ujamaa encourages people to share resources with one another and practice economic empowerment.

5. Nia (Purpose): On the fifth day of Kwanzaa, Nia promotes knowledge of self and responsibility to one’s community.

6. Kuumba (Creativity): On the sixth day of Kwanzaa, Kuumba celebrates creativity and encourages people to beautify their communities.

7. Imani (Faith): On the seventh day of Kwanzaa, Imani encourages people to believe in themselves and strive for justice and peace.

Kwanzaa provides an opportunity for African Americans to celebrate their culture, heritage, and collective history while connecting with their African roots. Celebrate this season by embracing these seven principles and deepening your connection with your culture and heritage!

6) The sixth day of Kwanzaa is devoted to a communal feast called Karamu

The sixth day of Kwanzaa is devoted to a communal feast called Karamu. This particular day celebrates the African tradition of communal feasts, which are used to share food and culture. Karamu celebrates the connection between people and reminds us of our shared history.

The feast marks the festivity end of Kwanzaa, except for the lighting and then extinguishing of all the candles, which happens on the seventh day, along with affirmations for the year. As such, it’s a time to come together and celebrate the richness of our culture while looking forward to a bright future. The gathering also acknowledges the importance of family and unity within the community.

The dishes served at Karamu vary according to regional customs. Some popular dishes include African favorites like jollof rice, okra soup, coconut curry chicken, plantains, sweet potatoes, and beans.

During the Karamu feast, families and friends come together to celebrate with music, dance, and storytelling. While feasting on delicious traditional dishes, everyone is reminded of their culture and heritage. It’s a beautiful way to unite people and recognize our common bond.

Karamu is a particular way to end Kwanzaa with a sense of unity and joy. It’s an opportunity to cherish our collective traditions and remember the importance of celebrating our unique culture.

7) Kwanzaa is a time to reflect on the past, celebrate the present, and look toward the future

Kwanzaa is a time to honor African American culture and values, including unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith. It’s also a time for reflection and celebration, with communal feasts and gatherings that bring together family and friends.

The origin of Kwanzaa dates to 1966 when activist Maulana Karenga created the holiday in response to the Watts riots in Los Angeles. He wanted to create an African American holiday focused on culture, values, and unity.

The seven principles of Kwanzaa — Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity), and Imani (Faith) — are the foundations of the celebration. These principles serve as a reminder of the commitment to community, respect for all humanity, and collective progress.

Kwanzaa is celebrated by lighting a candle holder (kinara) with seven candles for each day of the seven-day celebration. The holder is typically decorated with items such as corn husks, colorful cloth, and African sculptures. The official lighting direction is to light the center black candle first, then proceed from left to right, beginning with the leftmost red candle, then the second leftmost red candle, the third left (closest to the black candle), then the rightmost green candle, working inward with the next two in succession.  Extinguish each candle at the end of that day’s celebration and relight the next day with the corresponding candle for that day.

The goal is to light the candles after the black one by moving from left to right when facing the kinara. This procedure indicates that the people come first, then the struggle, and then the hope that comes from the struggle.

Kwanzaa is a significant opportunity to remember our African heritage and reflect on how far we’ve come in the struggle for justice, equity, and peace. It’s a time to celebrate our culture and recognize our shared values while looking toward the future with hope.-MM

Michele Mitchell Blog Writer for Ubuntu Village

Hi, I am Michele Mitchell, also known as Neftalia2017. I am the President and Founder of Ubuntu Village and the author of this blog post. I have been writing for ten years as a pastime.

One-Time
Monthly
Yearly

Make a one-time donation

Make a monthly donation

Make a yearly donation

Choose an amount

$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00

Or enter a custom amount:

$

Your contribution is greatly appreciated. Thank you. All monies received will be used to help our programs’ neediest.

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

DonateDonate monthlyDonate yearly

Reference:

https://www.officialkwanzaawebsite.org/

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Kindly check out our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram pages by clicking the icons below:

Contact

Support

Ubuntu Village will be traveling to Africa soon and we would like to document this trip and any other trips taken in a blog format.

%d bloggers like this: